Looking for life in a sea of loss: on Jasmine Te Hira’s Lost Content (2013) and The Beauty of Invisible Grief (2016)

We look before we see. It looks as if it were light as air; as if sweet breath plumped it up. When we look for longer, we can see that it changes shape, leaves a mark and grows ever heavier on the arm that wears it.

Made of ice, it is not just cold, but painful to the touch. The longer it is worn (or held on the bearers arm) the more the object becomes less tangible and more slippery. Inside the bracelet – once free in water, now trapped in ice, melting slowly in real time, but in abrasive temporal leaps for the viewer, hair, fingernails and pearls are slowly released, falling away from the arm that wears it.

Read my full essay on Jasmine Te Hira’s work over on the CIRCUIT – Artist Film and Video Aotearoa New Zealand blog.

Cinema Rediscovered Blog

At this year’s Cinema Rediscovered we launched our inaugural talent development programme in the shape of a critics day – The State of Things: Film Critics Day.  

Ahead of the programme, film critic Mark Kermode visited the Watershed to deliver the Second Annual Philip French Memorial Lecture, which I wrote about for the CR blog: An Honourable Art. 

Following the festival, participants created written articles and video essays for submission on the CR blog. Each of the articles have been edited by me and a further three articles were selected for publication on MUBI’s Notebook.